Ontario Building Code - Part 12 Resource Conservation (SB-10 and SB-12) Amendment. (2023)

Table of Contents
Summary General information Remit Code Coverage Type of Building Code Type of Building Code Energy Covered Basis for Energy Requirements Energy Uses and Functions Covered by the Code Enforcement Type of Enforcement On-site Inspections Occur Certification to Support Enforcement of Code Penalties for Non-compliance Measures Supporting Enforcement Values for New Buildings Other Requirements Set for Other Requirements Set for Other Requirements Set for Other Requirements Set for Other Requirements Set for Other Requirements Set for Other Requirements Set for Other Requirements Set for Other Requirements Set for Other Requirements Set for Other Requirements Set for Other Requirements Set for Code History and Future Targets Zero Energy Targets Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Multiple Sets of Data Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target Supporting Measures Search FAQs Videos

Summary

The current building energy code is Part 12 of the Ontario Building Code, which is split in to two sections (2012 amendments), SB-10 for large buildings and SB-12 for Housing (3 stories or less). The building code is a provincial regulation that applies across Ontario. Both sections address the thermal envelope requirements and energy consumption is addressed through performance requirements for most systems including, heating, cooling, ventilation, hot water systems and lighting (SB-10 only). Compliance can be shown through meeting prescriptive measures or an alternative simulated (reference building) performance method.

Ontario has a long history of building energy codes with the first code for energy efficiency of buildings being released in 1975. Since then, Ontario has continued to improve requirements with the current code including many dynamic aspects; low maximum U-value requirements, minimum efficiency requirements for most systems, strict air-tightness and thermal bridging requirements, increased performance labeling through EnerGuide, performance-based requirements for residential buildings undergoing renovation, code development overseen by a technical advisory committee and well implemented dissemination of training and information to the public.

General information

Full name of the code: Ontario Building Code - Part 12 Resource Conservation (SB-10 and SB-12) Amendment.

Year of Adoption: 2012

Date for enforcement: 2012-01-01

Authority in Charge: Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing Building and Development Branch.

Remit Code

Geographical Coverage: Ontario

Code set at: Regional/States

Coverage

  • Residential buildings
    • One family
    • Multiple family buildings
    • Other buildings
      • The energy performance budget is based and depends on the type of building, location etc. No EUI value available.
  • Commercial buildings
    • Offices
    • Retail and wholesale
    • Hotels
    • Hospitals
    • Educational buildings
    • Other buildings
      • The energy performance budget is based and depends on the type of building, location etc. No EUI value available.
  • Industrial buildings
  • Large Cities
  • All urban buildings
  • Rural buildings
  • GBPN Climate Classification
    • Cooling Based
    • Heating Based
    • Warm and Humid
    • Mixed

Type of Building Code

Type of Building Code

  • Cooling Based
  • Prescriptive Codes
  • Trade Off

    Trade off method concerning the building envelope is available to large buildings.

  • Performance Codes for Refurbishments

    Partially, calculations are based on a comparison with a prescriptive package (reference building).

  • Performance Codes for New Builds

    Partially, calculations are based on a comparison with a prescriptive package (reference building).

  • Energy Declaration
  • Model / reference Building

    Performance requirements are applicable if the design differs from the basic prescribed requirements, Sb-10 and SB-12. Performance refers to the alternative method of compliance - Energy Budget. Using this approach the designer must use recognized energy simulation software (such as HOT2000 V9.34c1.2 or newer), and submit documents which show that the annual energy use of the building is equal to a prescriptive package.

  • Mix of different models / Hybrids

Energy Covered

Basis for Energy Requirements

  • Overall performance frame
  • Final Energy

    Site Energy - energy used onsite, renewable energy can be credited against total onsite energy used.

  • Primary Energy
  • Life Cycle Assessment considered (embedded energy)

    Partially, no requirements at the design stage for residential buildings, however, LCA is considered when the prescriptive requirements are established for a new code. Large buildings are required to consider LCA when designing the building envelope.

Energy Uses and Functions Covered by the Code

  • Heating

    Minimum efficiency requirements for most systems in Residential and Commercial buildings.

  • Cooling

    Minimum efficiency requirements for most systems in Residential and Commercial buildings.

  • Dehumidification

    N/A

  • Ventilation

    Minimum efficiency requirements for most systems in Residential and Commercial buildings. HRV Minimum Efficiency requirements.

  • Airtightness

    2.5 air changes per hour at an air pressure differential of 50 Pa for detached homes, and 3.0 air changes per hour at an air pressure differential of 50 Pa for attached homes. Building Envelope Sealing requirements for commercial buildings.

  • Thermal bridging

    No linear value, however it is considered. Two options, either a continuous layer of insulation surrounding theexterior of the building or additional insulation is added to the rest of the building. For large building a detailed u-value calculation is required which takes into accountthermal bridging averages.

  • Hot water

    Residential - Domestic Hot Water Heater Minimum efficiency requirements. Commercial - hot water system equipment efficiency. All water heating equipment should meet efficiency requirements, including, hot water supply boilers used solely for heating potable water, pool heaters, and hot water storage tanks.

  • Technical installations
  • Lighting

    Lighting power density requirements for commercial buildings and Fluorescent lamp ballasts efficacy factor requirements.

  • Appliances
  • Design, position & orientation of building

    Partially, specific rating systems will award points for passive design elements - i.e. EnerGuide for residential buildings. Large building are required to reduce number of glazing elements facing east and west and increase the number of elements facing south.

  • Heat recovery

    No mandatory requirement, but most new residential buildings will install HRV systems or other similar packages that employ heat recovery. Commercial building requirements based on ASHRAE, efficiancy requirements depends on the level of outside air required.

  • Passive solar

    Partially, specific rating systems will award points for passive design elements - i.e. EnerGuide for residential buildings. Large building are required to reduce number of glazing elements facing east and west and increase the number of elements facing southystems will award points for passive design elements - i.e. EnerGuide for residential buildings. Large building are required to reduce number of glazing elements facing east and west and increase the number of elements facing south.

  • Passive cooling

    Partially, specific rating systems will award points for passive design elements - i.e. EnerGuide for residential buildings. Large building are required to reduce number of glazing elements facing east and west and increase the number of elements facing southg systems will award points for passive design elements - i.e. EnerGuide for residential buildings. Large building are required to reduce number of glazing elements facing east and west and increase the number of elements facing south.

  • Natural ventilation

    Partially, specific rating systems will award points for passive design elements - i.e. EnerGuide for residential buildings. Large building are required to reduce number of glazing elements facing east and west and increase the number of elements facing southng systems will award points for passive design elements - i.e. EnerGuide for residential buildings. Large building are required to reduce number of glazing elements facing east and west and increase the number of elements facing south.

  • Solar protection

    Partially, specific rating systems will award points for passive design elements - i.e. EnerGuide for residential buildings. Large building are required to reduce number of glazing elements facing east and west and increase the number of elements facing southsystems will award points for passive design elements - i.e. EnerGuide for residential buildings. Large building are required to reduce number of glazing elements facing east and west and increase the number of elements facing south.

  • Daylighting requirements

    Partially, no specifc daylighting requirements, however controls are required to reduce the level of electric lighting when daylight is sufficient.

  • Renewable Energy (solar, PV, others)

    Partially, no mandatory requirements at this stage, there are many local incentive programs where renewable systems are supported financially. Renewable energy produced can be credited against the allowed energy budget.

  • Local renewable sources
  • Energy Offsets/Green Certificates

Enforcement

Type of Enforcement

  • Local enforcement
    Local authorities are responsible for the plan and specification review process as well as onsite inspections which include checking energy efficiency requirements.
  • Third party inspection
    Some jurisdictions use third party inspectors. The government run EnerGuide program uses certified speacialist inspectors, trained by the government - not private.
  • Central enforcement
  • Accreditation of applicants
  • Post Occupancy control

On-site Inspections Occur

  • On-site inspections
  • During construction
  • Post completion
    For particular energy using systems and thermal fabric performance.
  • Post occupancy

Certification to Support Enforcement of Code

  • Energy Performance Certificate support BC
  • Positive labeling for building beyond the minimum BC level
  • Existence of EPC register database at national level
  • Inspection of boilers
    Partially, only at project completion to verify the system operates in accordance with design documentation. No ongoing testing requirements.
  • Inspection of HVAC systems
    Partially, only at project completion to verify the system operates in accordance with design documentation. No ongoing testing requirements.

Penalties for Non-compliance

  • None
  • Fine
    Fines can also be handed out for major offences, fines can be large if the entity responsible is a corporation or if it is a second or third offence.
  • Imprisonment
  • Refusal of permission to occupy
    Local authorities have the right to refuse permission to occupy.
  • Refusal of permission to construct
    Local authorities have the right to refuse permission to construct.
  • Demolition

Measures Supporting Enforcement

  • Commissioning requirements
    Testing requirements upon completion.
  • Airtightness testing required prior to compliance
    Partially, only when the design is excedding code requirements is a blower door test required to prove extra performance.
  • Mandatory Computer Modeling
    For most large commercial buildings.
  • Training of Inspectors
    Inspectors all have to be accredited. There are many courses available where inspectors can become accredited in different areas, HVAC, envelope, lighting etc. No CPD program at this stage.
  • Other

Values for New Buildings

Residential Buildings - Energy Efficiency For Housing (SB-12), ZONE 1 - Compliance Packages for Space Heating Equipment with AFUE ≥90%

Climate zone

Heating based

Coefficient for Comparison of Climate Zones

0.00

Mean Min Max
HDD (°C) 4407 4407 4407
CDD (°C) 322 322 322
U-Value (W/m²K)
Roof 0.113507 Roof2 0.18315
Wall 0.236407 Wall2 -
Floor 0.18315 Floor2 -
Window 1.6 Window2 2.8
Other 1.6 - -
Overall U-Value - - -
Window1 Window2
G Value/SHGC
Visible Transmission
Percent

Thermal bridge demands

Other Requirements Set for

  • Thermal bridge demands

    Thermal bridging requirements depend on the type of wall materials used.

  • Ventilation requirements (Electricity consumption for air transportation?)
  • Pressure testing for ducting

    Not known at this stage.

  • Domestic Hot Water COP - Heat Pump

    Domestic Hot Water Heater Minimum EF

  • Value for airtightness
  • Requirements for heat recovery

    No mandatory requirement, but most new residential buildings will install HRV systems or other similar packages that employ heat recovery. Commercial building requirements based on ASHRAE, efficiancy requirements depends on the level of outside air required.

  • Technical HVAC systems

    Not known at this stage.

  • Coefficient of performance of HVAC system
  • Requirements for efficient lighting

Residential Buildings - Energy Efficiency For Housing (SB-12), ZONE 1 - Compliance Packages for Space Heating Equipment with AFUE ≥78 % and < 90%

Climate zone

Heating based

Coefficient for Comparison of Climate Zones

0.00

Mean Min Max
HDD (°C) 4407 4407 4407
CDD (°C) 322 322 322
U-Value (W/m²K)
Roof 0.113507 Roof2 0.18315
Wall 0.195695 Wall2 -
Floor 0.18315 Floor2 -
Window 1.6 Window2 2.8
Other 1.6 - -
Overall U-Value - - -
Window1 Window2
G Value/SHGC
Visible Transmission
Percent

Thermal bridge demands

Other Requirements Set for

  • Thermal bridge demands

    Thermal bridging requirements depend on the type of wall materials used.

  • Ventilation requirements (Electricity consumption for air transportation?)
  • Pressure testing for ducting

    Not known at this stage

    (Video) CON8413: TOPIC 1 (OVERVIEW OF 2012 ONTARIO BUILDING CODE)

  • Value for airtightness
  • Requirements for heat recovery

    No mandatory requirement, but most new residential buildings will install HRV systems or other similar packages that employ heat recovery. Commercial building requirements based on ASHRAE, efficiancy requirements depends on the level of outside air required.

  • Technical HVAC systems

    HRV Minimum Efficiency of 55%.

  • Requirements for efficient lighting

Residential Buildings - Energy Efficiency For Housing (SB-12), ZONE 1 - Compliance Packages for Electric Space Heating

Climate zone

Heating based

Coefficient for Comparison of Climate Zones

0.00

Mean Min Max
HDD (°C) 4407 4407 4407
CDD (°C) 322 322 322
U-Value (W/m²K)
Roof 0.113507 Roof2 0.18315
Wall 0.195695 Wall2 -
Floor 0.18315 Floor2 -
Window 1.6 Window2 2.8
Other 1.6 - -
Overall U-Value - - -
Window1 Window2
G Value/SHGC
Visible Transmission
Percent

Thermal bridge demands

Other Requirements Set for

Energy Efficiency For large buildings (SB-10).

Climate zone

Heating based

Coefficient for Comparison of Climate Zones

0.00

Mean Min Max
HDD (°C) 4407 4407 4407
CDD (°C) 322 322 322
U-Value (W/m²K)
Roof 0.12 Roof2 0.2
Wall 0.29 Wall2 0.45
Floor 0.15 Floor2 0.36
Window 1.42 Window2 2.56
Other 1.42 - -
Overall U-Value - - -
Window1 Window2
G Value/SHGC 0.35 0.36
Visible Transmission
Percent

Thermal bridge demands

Other Requirements Set for

  • Thermal bridge demands

    Thermal bridging requirements depend on the type of wall materials used.

  • Pressure testing for ducting

    Not known at this stage.

  • Domestic Hot Water COP - Heat Pump
  • Requirements for heat recovery
  • Technical HVAC systems
  • Coefficient of performance of HVAC system
  • Requirements for efficient lighting

    Lighting power density requirements for commercial buildings and Fluorescent lamp ballasts efficacy factor requirements

Energy Efficiency For large buildings (SB-10).

Climate zone

Heating based

Coefficient for Comparison of Climate Zones

0.00

Mean Min Max
HDD (°C) 4407 4407 4407
CDD (°C) 322 322 322
U-Value (W/m²K)
Roof 0.12 Roof2 0.2
Wall 0.26 Wall2 0.4
Floor 0.15 Floor2 0.32
Window 1.42 Window2 2.56
Other 1.42 - -
Overall U-Value - - -
Window1 Window2
G Value/SHGC 0.4 0.36
Visible Transmission
Percent

Thermal bridge demands

Other Requirements Set for

  • Thermal bridge demands

    Thermal bridging requirements depend on the type of wall materials used.

  • Pressure testing for ducting

    Not known at this stage

  • Requirements for heat recovery
  • Technical HVAC systems
  • Coefficient of performance of HVAC system
  • Requirements for efficient lighting

    Lighting power density requirements for commercial buildings and Fluorescent lamp ballasts efficacy factor requirements.

Energy Efficiency For large buildings (SB-10).

Climate zone

Heating based

Coefficient for Comparison of Climate Zones

0.00

Mean Min Max
HDD (°C) 4407 4407 4407
CDD (°C) 322 322 322
U-Value (W/m²K)
Roof 0.19 Roof2 0.53
Wall 0.36 Wall2 0.7
Floor 0.19 Floor2 0.61
Window 3.12 Window2 7.72
Other 3.12 - -
Overall U-Value - - -
Window1 Window2
G Value/SHGC
Visible Transmission
Percent

Thermal bridge demands

Other Requirements Set for

  • Thermal bridge demands

    Thermal bridging requirements depend on the type of wall materials used.

  • Ventilation requirements (Electricity consumption for air transportation?)
  • Pressure testing for ducting

    Not known at this stage

  • Domestic Hot Water COP - Heat Pump
  • Requirements for heat recovery
  • Technical HVAC systems
  • Requirements for efficient lighting

    Lighting power density requirements for commercial buildings and Fluorescent lamp ballasts efficacy factor requirements

Energy Efficiency For large buildings (SB-10).

Climate zone

Heating based

Coefficient for Comparison of Climate Zones

0.00

Mean Min Max
HDD (°C) 4407 4407 4407
CDD (°C) 322 322 322
U-Value (W/m²K)
Roof 0.12 Roof2 0.18
Wall 0.26 Wall2 0.4
Floor 0.15 Floor2 0.32
Window 1.42 Window2 2.56
Other 1.42 - -
Overall U-Value - - -
(Video) BCD410-1 - International Building Code Essentials for Wood Construction
Window1 Window2
G Value/SHGC 0.4 0.46
Visible Transmission
Percent

Thermal bridge demands

Other Requirements Set for

  • Thermal bridge demands

    Thermal bridging requirements depend on the type of wall materials used.

  • Ventilation requirements (Electricity consumption for air transportation?)
  • Pressure testing for ducting
  • Domestic Hot Water COP - Heat Pump
  • Requirements for heat recovery
  • Technical HVAC systems
  • Requirements for efficient lighting

    Lighting power density requirements for commercial buildings and Fluorescent lamp ballasts efficacy factor requirements

Energy Efficiency For large buildings (SB-10).

Climate zone

Heating based

Coefficient for Comparison of Climate Zones

0.00

Mean Min Max
HDD (°C) 4407 4407 4407
CDD (°C) 322 322 322
U-Value (W/m²K)
Roof 0.12 Roof2 0.18
Wall 0.26 Wall2 0.34
Floor 0.15 Floor2 0.29
Window 1.42 Window2 2.56
Other 1.42 - -
Overall U-Value - - -
Window1 Window2
G Value/SHGC 0.4 0.39
Visible Transmission
Percent

Thermal bridge demands

Other Requirements Set for

  • Thermal bridge demands

    Thermal bridging requirements depend on the type of wall materials used.

  • Ventilation requirements (Electricity consumption for air transportation?)
  • Pressure testing for ducting

    Not known at this stage

  • Domestic Hot Water COP - Heat Pump
  • Requirements for heat recovery
  • Technical HVAC systems
  • Requirements for efficient lighting

    Lighting power density requirements for commercial buildings and Fluorescent lamp ballasts efficacy factor requirements

Energy Efficiency For large buildings (SB-10).

Climate zone

Heating based

Coefficient for Comparison of Climate Zones

0.00

Mean Min Max
HDD (°C) 4407 4407 4407
CDD (°C) 322 322 322
U-Value (W/m²K)
Roof 0.15 Roof2 0.39
Wall 0.36 Wall2 0.59
Floor 0.19 Floor2 0.61
Window 2.56 Window2 7.72
Other 2.56 - -
Overall U-Value - - -
Window1 Window2
G Value/SHGC
Visible Transmission
Percent

Thermal bridge demands

Other Requirements Set for

  • Thermal bridge demands

    Thermal bridging requirements depend on the type of wall materials used.

  • Ventilation requirements (Electricity consumption for air transportation?)
  • Pressure testing for ducting

    Not known at this stage.

  • Domestic Hot Water COP - Heat Pump
  • Requirements for heat recovery
  • Technical HVAC systems
  • Requirements for efficient lighting

    Lighting power density requirements for commercial buildings and Fluorescent lamp ballasts efficacy factor requirements.

Energy Efficiency For large buildings (SB-10).

Climate zone

Heating based

Coefficient for Comparison of Climate Zones

0.00

Mean Min Max
HDD (°C) 4407 4407 4407
CDD (°C) 322 322 322
U-Value (W/m²K)
Roof 0.1 Roof2 0.16
Wall 0.26 Wall2 0.34
Floor 0.15 Floor2 0.25
Window 1.42 Window2 2.56
Other 1.42 - -
Overall U-Value - - -
Window1 Window2
G Value/SHGC 0.45 0.46
Visible Transmission
Percent

Thermal bridge demands

Other Requirements Set for

  • Thermal bridge demands

    Thermal bridging requirements depend on the type of wall materials used.

  • Ventilation requirements (Electricity consumption for air transportation?)
  • Pressure testing for ducting

    Not known at this stage

  • Domestic Hot Water COP - Heat Pump
  • Requirements for heat recovery
  • Technical HVAC systems
  • Requirements for efficient lighting

    Lighting power density requirements for commercial buildings and Fluorescent lamp ballasts efficacy factor requirements.

Energy Efficiency For large buildings (SB-10).

Climate zone

Heating based

Coefficient for Comparison of Climate Zones

0.00

Mean Min Max
HDD (°C) 4407 4407 4407
CDD (°C) 322 322 322
U-Value (W/m²K)
Roof 0.1 Roof2 0.16
Wall 0.26 Wall2 0.34
Floor 0.15 Floor2 0.25
Window 1.42 Window2 2.56
Other 1.42 - -
Overall U-Value - - -
Window1 Window2
G Value/SHGC
Visible Transmission
Percent

Thermal bridge demands

Other Requirements Set for

  • Thermal bridge demands

    Thermal bridging requirements depend on the type of wall materials used.

  • Ventilation requirements (Electricity consumption for air transportation?)
  • Pressure testing for ducting

    Not known at this stage

  • Domestic Hot Water COP - Heat Pump
  • Requirements for heat recovery
  • Technical HVAC systems
  • Requirements for efficient lighting

    Lighting power density requirements for commercial buildings and Fluorescent lamp ballasts efficacy factor requirements.

Energy Efficiency For large buildings (SB-10).

Climate zone

Heating based

Coefficient for Comparison of Climate Zones

0.00

(Video) Building 101, Topic 8: Ontario Building Code

Mean Min Max
HDD (°C) 4407 4407 4407
CDD (°C) 322 322 322
U-Value (W/m²K)
Roof 0.15 Roof2 0.39
Wall 0.36 Wall2 0.51
Floor 0.19 Floor2 0.5
Window 2.56 Window2 7.72
Other 2.56 - -
Overall U-Value - - -
Window1 Window2
G Value/SHGC
Visible Transmission
Percent

Thermal bridge demands

Other Requirements Set for

  • Thermal bridge demands

    Thermal bridging requirements depend on the type of wall materials used.

  • Ventilation requirements (Electricity consumption for air transportation?)
  • Pressure testing for ducting

    Not known at this stage

  • Domestic Hot Water COP - Heat Pump
  • Requirements for heat recovery
  • Technical HVAC systems
  • Requirements for efficient lighting

    Lighting power density requirements for commercial buildings and Fluorescent lamp ballasts efficacy factor requirements.

Code History and Future Targets

  • Are stakeholders informed of future targets far in advance?

    Yes

    Are stakeholders informed of future targets far in advance Note

    Stakeholders are involved in the development process and informed of future targets as soon as possible.

Zero Energy Targets

  • Are all end uses considered in the target?
  • Is there a realistic roadmap towards ZEB
  • National Target date for nZEB
  • Special Requirements for public buildings

Number of Earlier Codes

3

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

    (Video) Existing Building Code Presentation

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Multiple Sets of Data

  • Levels beyond minimum
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned)

    1975, 1993, 2006

  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Actual level of Energy Consumption in Target

  • Relative target in percent
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Levels set in GHG emissions
  • Levels calculated based on prescriptive

Supporting Measures

  • Incentives/Rewards to Encourage People to go beyond Minimum Level?
  • Involvement of Stakeholders in the Development of Codes
  • Level of Training Provided to Stakeholders Following Implementation of Code?
  • Provision of Appropriate Information for General Public
  • Education Systems to Ensure Capacity
  • Supporting Certification Schemes
  • Codes Free to Access?

FAQs

What is SB 10 Ontario Building Code? ›

SB-10 and 90.1 limit the amount of glazing to 40% of the vertical envelope area17. The amount of glazing may be increased by using higher performance glazing provided the product of the Area and U value in the design building is less that that of the code compliant building.

What is the latest version of Ontario Building Code? ›

Ontario Regulation 451/22

allow for the early and partial occupancy for super tall buildings (effective November 1, 2022) remove barriers to multi-unit modular housing construction projects (effective July 1, 2022)​ allow mass timber buildings to be constructed up to 12 storeys high (effective July 1, 2022)

Is the Ontario Building Code available online? ›

digital download! You can request a PDF copy, for FREE, here: https://www.ontario.ca/page/request-digital-copy-

What parts of Division B apply to buildings? ›

1) Parts 1, 7 and 8 of Division B apply to all buildings covered in this By-law. (See Article 1.1. 1.1.)

What are SB 9 and SB 10? ›

The bills, known as Senate Bill 9 (SB 9) and Senate Bill 10 (SB 10), have legalized duplexes and quadplexes in areas that were previously zoned for single-family-only housing.

Who wrote SB 10? ›

“SB10 provides cities with a powerful, fast, and effective tool to allow light-touch density exactly where it should be: near jobs, near public transportation, and in existing urbanized areas,” said the bill's author, state Sen. Scott Weiner, D-San Francisco.

What are the changes to the building regulations in 2022? ›

The updated regulations include amendments to Approved Documents Part F (Ventilation) and Part L (Conservation of fuel and power) and the release of a new Approved Document for Overheating (Part O) and Infrastructure for charging electric vehicles (Part S).

Is the Ontario Building Code amended every 10 years? ›

New editions or major amendments to Ontario's Building Code are generally released every five years to coincide with updates to the National Construction Codes.

When did Ontario introduced regulations 368 12 for new accessibility requirements in the Ontario Building Code? ›

Summary of Decision: On December 27, 2013, Ontario Regulation 368/13 was filed to amend the barrier-free design requirements of the 2012 Building Code, O. Reg. 332/12.

What happens if you build a shed without a permit in Ontario? ›

An individual who is charged and found guilty of an offence under the Building Code Act, 1992 , such as building without a permit, can be fined up to $50,000 for a first offence and up to $100,000 for subsequent offences.

Do I need a permit to build a shed in my backyard in Ontario? ›

Is a building permit required? The Ontario Building Code was recently changed to allow for sheds up to 160 square feet to be built WITHOUT a building permit. Any structure larger than 160 square feet requires a building permit. For structures over 160 square feet, we will handle the permit process for you.

Do you need a permit to pour concrete in your backyard Ontario? ›

Check with your local building authority for the rules that apply to your specific project. Is your planned concrete patio less than 30 inches above grade? If so, you're in luck – you most likely will not need a building permit, although your concrete contractor might have to pull an excavation permit.

How many floors before an elevator is required Ontario? ›

In the Ontario Fire Code, existing buildings greater than six storeys with residential occupancies are required to have at least one elevator provided (identified on the street floor) for use by firefighters.

What are the 3 parts in division? ›

There are three main parts to a division problem: the dividend, the divisor, and the quotient. The dividend is the number that will be divided. The divisor is the number of “people” that the number is being divided among. The quotient is the answer.

What makes a construction type A or B? ›

"Type A" buildings are ambitious, rigidly organized, highly status-conscious, sensitive, impatient, anxious, proactive, and concerned with time management. "Type B" buildings live at a lower stress level and typically work steadily, enjoying achievement but not becoming stressed when they do not achieve.

Does my house qualify for SB9? ›

What Are The Exclusions? SB 9 is structured to encourage housing development in urban environments while protecting vulnerable populations and ecological areas. To be eligible, a property must be located within an urban area and zoned for single-family use.

What does SB 9 allow? ›

It allows homeowners in most areas around the state to divide their property into two lots, thereby increasing opportunities for homeownership in their neighborhood; and. It allows two homes to be built on each of those lots, with the effect of legalizing fourplexes in areas that previously only allowed one home.

When did SB 9 pass? ›

SB 9 And The “End of Single Family Zoning” in California: What You Need To Know. Governor Newsom recently signed SB 9 into law which takes effect in January 2022, requiring cities and counties to ministerially approve certain two-unit projects and lot splits.

Who authored sb9? ›

"Senate Bill 9, by Senate pro Tem Toni Atkins, was proposed after years of discussion on the best way forward to create more affordable housing, bringing everyone to the table in thoughtful engagement.

What does sb10 mean? ›

SB 10 authorizes the building of up to ten units per property, while SB 9 caps development at four. SB 9 requires that cities employ a ministerial rather than discretionary approval process for all proposed projects, whereas SB 10 leaves it up to individual cities to decide which approach they want to take.

Who authored SB 9? ›

Senate Bill 9 has garnered significant public attention this year since it proposes adding by-right density to all single-family zoning districts in California. The Bill is authored by Senate Pro Tem Toni Atkins and is currently in the Assembly Appropriations Committee and has not yet been set for a hearing date.

Will building materials go down in 2022? ›

In July 2022, the year-over-year change in materials and components for construction, excluding capital investment, labor, and imports was 14.8%. The growth rate of increase had dropped, but that has changed. The August figures show that combined materials and components in construction were up 15.2% year over year.

Is there a 10 year rule for building regs? ›

This can vary from council to council but is usually no more than 10-15 years. Regulation certificates can be issued without pulling apart the entire structure although some opening up will usually be required.

How much has building materials increased 2022? ›

2021, according to the seasonally adjusted figures. This followed a 9.4% decrease in March 2022, compared to March 2021. The month-on-month change shows a 1.8% decrease in April 2022. This followed a 0.7% decrease in March 2022, on the same basis.

What is the latest version of the Building Code? ›

2021 International Building Code (IBC) BASIC.

What is the 2 Year building regs rule? ›

Under section 35 and section 35(a) of the Building Act 1984, if a person carrying out building work contravenes the building regulations the local authority may prosecute them in the Magistrates Court where an unlimited time may be imposed and such prosecution is possible up to two years after completion of such ...

Is the Ontario Building Code retroactive? ›

Ontario's Building Code

The Building Code's construction requirements apply to new construction; it is not a retroactive regulation and does not apply to an existing building.

When did the latest change or amendment to construction projects regulations O Reg 213 91 take place? ›

213/91: CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS. Consolidation Period: From July 1, 2022 to the e-Laws currency date. Last amendment: 375/22.

When did building regulations 2010 come into force? ›

New regulations authorising local councils in England and Wales to charge to recover the costs of carrying out their main building control services (ie checking plans and notices and inspecting building work subject to building regulations) came into force on 1 April 2010 and took effect on 1 October 2010.

Do building permits expire in Ontario? ›

The Act requires people to obtain a building permit to undertake construction, as defined in the Act. Once issued, a building permit authorizes the construction proposed and does not have an expiry date.

What happens if I finish my basement without a permit in Ontario? ›

There are consequences for not getting a permit. You could face a fine, or the municipality may force you to remove walls, ceilings, cabinets and other finishes so that an inspector can determine if the work complies with the building requirements. In the worst case, they'll have the renovation removed entirely.

Do I need a permit to renovate my kitchen in Ontario? ›

Renovations without any structural modifications do not require a permit. Most kitchen renovation projects require a permit under the Ontario Building Code.

Do you need a permit to replace windows in Ontario? ›

When it comes to windows, you only need a permit if you will be making structural or material alterations to your house as part of the install. Simply stated, this means that if you are creating new openings for, or increasing the size of windows, a permit will be required.

What happens if you build a shed without planning permission? ›

If you build without planning permission, you may not be breaking any rules. However, if there is a planning breach, you may have to submit a retrospective application or even appeal against an enforcement notice.

What is the maximum size shed you can build without planning permission? ›

Outbuildings and garages to be single storey with maximum eaves height of 2.5 metres and maximum overall height of four metres with a dual pitched roof or three metres for any other roof.

What's the biggest size shed without permit? ›

A building permit shall not be required for sheds up to 120 square feet. The shed's structure is still required to meet the requirements of the California Residential Code or the California Building Code.

Can I cement my own backyard? ›

You can build a DIY concrete patio step by step

It is possible to build an attractive concrete patio yourself, but careful planning and preparation is necessary. Be sure to place all the concrete at once; a big patio can be broken down into smaller manageable sections using 2x4's.

What degree can you not pour concrete? ›

Experts agree that the best temperature to pour concrete is between 50-60 °F. The necessary chemical reactions that set and strengthen concrete slow significantly below 50 °F and are almost non-existent below 40 °F.

When can you not pour concrete? ›

When temperatures dip below 40 °F, the chemical reactions that strengthen concrete slow down and can lead to weaker concrete. If concrete curing temperatures are below freezing, the water inside the concrete can freeze and expand, resulting in cracks.

Do you need an elevator room on every floor? ›

Elevator lobbies are required on each floor where an elevator shaft enclosure (i.e. hoistway) connects three or more stories. The exceptions to the code do not require lobbies under the following conditions or locations: On the level of exit discharge if the level is sprinklered in accordance with NFPA 13.

How many floors require a lift? ›

A well-equipped elevator is needed if there are 4 storeys or more above ground.

What is the gap between elevator and floor? ›

Door Gap Basics

In order for your elevator to function properly, it's necessary for there to be a small gap between the hoistway and the elevator car. However, it's possible for the gap to grow too wide over time, posing a potential safety risk. Generally speaking, the gap space should not exceed 75mm or three inches.

What are the four types of divisions? ›

3.1 Program Structure
  • The Identification Division.
  • The Environment Division.
  • The Data Division.
  • The Procedure Division.

What are the 5 division steps? ›

There are five long division steps that can be used to simplify this version of the method:
  • Divide.
  • Multiply.
  • Subtract.
  • Bring the next number down.
  • Repeat.
19 Oct 2022

What is the difference between Type 1 and 2 construction? ›

Type I: Noncombustible (or limited-combustible) construction with a high level of fire resistance, typically concrete construction. Type II: Noncombustible (or limited-combustible) construction with a lower level of fire resistance than Type I, typically this is steel construction with or without fireproofing.

What is the difference between construction type II A and II B? ›

For example, Type II-B construction does not require any additional fire-resistance rating, and allows the noncombustible building elements to be exposed, where Type II-A construction requires the application of fire-resistant materials to be applied to these same building elements.

What is a Class 10b structure? ›

Class 10b is a structure being a fence, mast, antenna, retaining wall, swimming pool, or the like. A Class 10c building is a private bushfire shelter.

What is limiting distance Ontario Building Code? ›

Limiting distance (LD) means the distance from an exposing building face to a property line, to the centre line of a street, lane or public thoroughfare or to an imaginary line between two buildings or fire compartments on the same property, measured at right angles to the exposing building face.

What is a Part 9 building Ontario? ›

Part 9 buildings are defined as fewer than three storeys in height and smaller than 600 m2 in area. The details of the most commonly used fire separation assemblies that satisfy the minimum fire ratings requirements of Part 9 of the OBC are presented.

What are Type A and Type B buildings? ›

"Type A" buildings are ambitious, rigidly organized, highly status-conscious, sensitive, impatient, anxious, proactive, and concerned with time management. "Type B" buildings live at a lower stress level and typically work steadily, enjoying achievement but not becoming stressed when they do not achieve.

What is Class A and Class B construction? ›

Class B buildings “compete for a wide range of users with rents in the average range for the market.” They're generally nice, fully-functional buildings but don't typically boast the same high-end fixtures, architecture, and striking lobbies as Class A buildings.

What is a Type B structure? ›

Class B buildings are fire-resistant structures. Floors and roofs in class B structures are formed or precast concrete slabs. The exterior walls, generally, are masonry or reinforced concrete curtain walls or any of the many types of wall panels of concrete, metal, glass or stone.

What is the largest structure you can build in Ontario without a permit? ›

You must obtain a building permit before you: construct any new building over ten square meters in area or place another structure, such as a mobile home, on your property. make renovations or repairs or add to a building.

How close to property line can a building be? ›

15.14. 020 Summary of regulations.
TypeStandard
Yard buildings on common lotsUnder 6 ft. high: may be placed up to any property line subject to building or fire code limitations; 6 ft. – 8 ft. high: at least 3 ft. from any property line.
33 more rows

What are the 4 types of building structures? ›

Here are some of the building structures that are found in the field of construction:
  • Wood frame. Wooden frame buildings have been around for many years and in fact, this type of building structure is the oldest of them all. ...
  • Light gauge steel. ...
  • Steel frame. ...
  • Concrete frame. ...
  • Pre-engineered.
19 Apr 2019

What are the three types of building codes? ›

Codes regulate the design and construction of structures where adopted into law. Examples of building codes began in ancient times. In the USA the main codes are the International Building Code or International Residential Code [IBC/IRC], electrical codes and plumbing, mechanical codes.

What are the 4 objectives of the Ontario Building Code? ›

The principles on which the standards in the Code are based are Health, Safety, Accessibility and Energy Efficiency.

What is Part 11 of the Ontario Building Code? ›

Part 11 of the Ontario Building Code allows building owners some flexibility in maintaining the existing appeal of their property and to circumnavigate the updated requirements of the most recent Ontario Building Code.

How long does a Part 9 last? ›

A Part 9 Debt Agreement usually lasts for five years. Depending on your circumstances, it may be extended or reduced. A Debt Agreement will be noted on your credit file, and your name will be added to the National Personal Insolvency Index.

How big can I build a shed without a permit in Ontario? ›

Construction of a one-storey detached storage shed that measures 15 square metres or less in gross area, is ancillary to the principal dwelling and without plumbing, does not require a building permit.

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