Establishing a Lawn in Oklahoma — Oklahoma State University Turfgrass Science (2023)

Establishing your lawn involves turfgrass selection, soil and site preparation, planting, and post-establishment care of the new turf. Proper planning and methods employed for each of these steps helps to ensure a successful and satisfactory lawn establishment. This fact sheet was prepared to describe the necessary steps to properly establish a lawn in Oklahoma.

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Turfgrass Selection

Turfgrass selection involves choosing a turfgrass species and cultivar that is adapted to the environmental conditions of Oklahoma and that fits your personal needs and interests. The grass should also be suited to the physical or environ­mental limitations of the planting site, such as shade, no supplemental water, or poor soil conditions. Bermudagrass, buffalograss, and zoysiagrass are the warm-season (grows in the summer and dormant in the winter) turfgrass species most commonly planted in Oklahoma. Occasionally, cool-season turfgrass species, such as tall fescue, Kentucky bluegrass, and perennial ryegrass are planted on shaded sites because the warm-season turfgrasses cannot tolerate shade. These grasses also can be utilized in the full sun, but only when a convenient means of irrigation is available. Choosing the right cool-season turfgrass cultivar is essential for its success during the hot, dry summers of Oklahoma.

Table 1 summarizes the commonly planted turfgrasses in Oklahoma and some of their characteristics that should be considered when selecting a turfgrass species. For more detailed information, see Fact Sheet HLA-6418, Selecting a Lawn Grass for Oklahoma.

Soil and Site Preparation

Proper soil and site preparation creates optimal conditions for turfgrass establishment and forms the foundation of the turfgrass area. Try to complete soil and site preparation just prior to planting. The seedbed surface should be smooth, without clods, and the soil should be moist but firm, properly fertilized, as well as loose and granular. Uniformity of site preparation is critical in obtaining a uniform turfgrass stand. A firm, weed-free seedbed with just enough loose surface soil for uniform depth of cover is essential. Such seedbeds aid in obtaining a uniform planting depth and improve seed-soil contact. Soil and site preparation is the same regardless of whether you choose to establish your lawn by seeding, or by sodding, plugging, or sprigging.

The following steps describe proper soil and site prepara­tion.

1. Calculate the area, normally in square feet, that will be planted in turf. This is important in purchasing the appropriate quantities of fertilizer, seed, sod, and other materials used in establishing and maintaining your lawn. One method of calculating your lawn area is to divide it into smaller sections (rectangles, triangles, circles, etc.), calculate the area of each smaller section, and then add up the area of the smaller sections to obtain the total lawn area. A second method involves determining the area of your lot and then subtracting the area for spaces devoted to non-lawn use, such as the house, driveway, and ornamental beds.

2. Obtain soil samples for a soil test to determine phosphorus and potassium levels and pH (pH of 7 is neutral, below is acid, and above is alkaline). These should be taken two months prior to your planting date in order to allow sufficient time for you to receive your fertilizer recommendations and purchase the appropriate materials. To soil test, take about 10 to 15 cores, of a consistent depth (3 to 4 inches), over the whole lawn area. Discard plant material, such as stems and leaves. Place all samples in a container and mix thoroughly. Remove a one-pint soil sample and take it to your county Extension office for soil-test analysis. Your county educator will write your fertilizer recommendations, based on your soil-test results. If applications of phosphorus, potassium, lime (to raise pH), or sulfur (to lower pH) are recommended, then incorporate these materials into the upper 4 to 6 inches of soil as discussed in number 9. You will also need to broadcast a “starter” fertilizer on the surface of the finished seedbed, as discussed in number 11.

3. Control noxious, perennial weeds with Roundup, Kleenup, or GLYFOS prior to cultivation. Naturalized bermudagrass is our greatest problem in Oklahoma. The best time to control bermudagrass with Roundup is in September during periods of active plant growth. If you are planting a cool-season turfgrass species, wait at least one week after treatment before cultivation and seedbed prepara­tion. If you are planting a warm-season turfgrass species, you can wait until April or May to begin cultivation and seedbed preparation.

4. Remove debris such as wood, pipe, rock, stumps, and any other objects that will interfere with turfgrass root growth and water movement through the soil.

5. Cultivate the upper 8 to 10 inches of soil by means of a field cultivator, disk, or similar cultivating equipment. Deep cultivation may not be feasible in all situations, but at least cultivate or roto-till the upper 4 to 6 inches of soil. Loosening the soil surface by cultivation is critical for al­leviating compacted, hard, tight soils; for incorporating fertilizer and soil amendment materials throughout the entire root-zone soil; and for creating a proper soil, air, and water relationship in the seedbed for optimum turfgrass establishment.

(Video) OSU's Turf Grass Program

6. Tight clay soils can be improved by incorporating either topsoil or sand to increase soil aeration and water drain­age. At least 4 to 6 inches of a loamy topsoil or coarse sand must be uniformly incorporated into the upper 2 to 4 inches of underlying soil to achieve soil improvement. Sandy soils are modified with topsoil to increase water and nutrient retention. Incorporate 6 to 8 inches of a loamy topsoil into the upper 4 to 6 inches of underlying soil. If the soil being modified lacks organic matter, add 10 to 15 percent by volume of a well decomposed peat or other organic material. It is also important that soil amendments be uniformly incorporated into the existing soil and not layered on top of the surface.

7. Installation of subsurface drain tile and underground irrigation systems should be completed prior to final seedbed preparation. Drainage lines should be 6 to 18 inches deep, depending on the weight of anticipated traffic. Irrigation main lines should be placed below the frost line while lateral lines in ornamental beds should be 18 inches deep and lateral lines in turf areas should be 12 inches deep.

8. If improvement of soil pH is indicated by a soil test, incorporate the recommended amount of lime or sulfur into the upper 4 to 6 inches of soil.

9. If indicated by a soil test, incorporate the recommended amount of phosphorus, potassium, and other fertilizer elements, except nitrogen, into the upper 4 to 6 inches of soil.

10. Complete final grading and smoothing. There should be at least a one percent slope away from buildings to prevent water from settling around them. Small areas can be sufficiently smoothed by hand raking. At planting, the seedbed should be firm enough to walk on, with the upper 0.5 inch of soil loose. If footprints are deeper than 0.5 inch when the soil is walked on, the seedbed is too loose and will require firming by rolling and/or watering. Seed planted in soil that is too loose is usually planted too deeply and will die before seedlings can emerge. Conversely, if the soil surface becomes too hard before planting, then lightly till the seedbed so the upper soil surface is loose. Never sod, plug, or sprig into dry soil. Several days prior to these operations, water the seedbed to a 5- to 6-inch depth.

11. Just before or after planting, apply a “starter” fertilizer (containing nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium) on the seedbed surface at a rate of 1 to 2 pounds N per 1000 ft2. This fertilization will ensure that ample amounts of fertilizer elements are in the location of roots of germinated seedlings or new plants, thus ensuring rapid establishment.

Planting

The critical factors in planting turfgrasses are listed and discussed below.

1. Plant a recommended turfgrass species and cultivar that is well adapted to the environmental conditions of Oklahoma and one that is also suited to your planting site and interests. See Fact Sheet HLA-6418, Selecting a Lawn Grass for Oklahoma for detailed information.

2. Plant the recommended amount of seeds or vegetative material (sod, sprigs, and plugs) to ensure rapid coverage (Table 2).

3. The amount of actual or percentage of pure live seed (PLS) in a bag varies from variety to variety. It is best to seed based on the amount of pure live seeding rates than simply using a general rate recommendation that does not take into account variation in seed purity and germination viability between sources. To calculate the actual amount of your specific variety to plant, look at the seed label (usually on the back of the bag) and note the percent of seed purity and percent germination. The amount of this seed to plant is calculated as follows:
Amount per 1,000 ft2 = percent pure seed listed on your label (see Table 2) X percent germination on label

(Video) Turf and Lawn Management Facts

4. Uniformly distribute seed, sprigs, or plugs over the lawn area to prevent bare spots or areas that are likely to be invaded by weeds and slowly covered by turf.

5. Plant when environmental conditions favor rapid turfgrass establishment. In the case of warm-season turfgrasses this means that there is enough time for good plant development before frost. In the case of cool-season turfgrasses there should be adequate time for growth before hot, dry summer conditions come about.
Table 2 summarizes the commonly planted turfgrasses in Oklahoma and their planting characteristics.

Seeding

Small lawns can be broadcast seeded with a 2- to 3-foot wide drop spreader. Divide the recommended amount of seed (Table 2) into two equal portions and spread each portion in a different direction to ensure proper distribution (Figure 1). It may be necessary to dilute small amounts of seed with sand, Milorganite, or similar material to increase the amount of bulk material being spread.

Seed when temperature and moisture conditions favor rapid germination and establishment. Warm-season turf­grasses should be seeded when daily mean temperatures of the upper soil surface range from 68° to 95° F. In Okla­homa, this usually means not seeding (or sodding, plugging, or sprigging) warm-season turfgrasses before May 1. On the other hand, warm-season turfgrasses should be seeded early enough in the growing season to allow enough time for them to become established before winter. Most seeded bermudagrasses should be planted by July 1. Cool-season turfgrasses germinate optimally when daily mean temperatures of the upper soil surface range from 68° to 86° F. Thus, the ideal time to seed Kentucky bluegrass, perennial ryegrass, or tall fescue is in late September and October. Temperatures become too cold in November and December for optimal germination and establishment. The second best time to seed cool-season turfgrasses is in March. Fall plantings of cool-season turfgrasses are superior over spring plantings because there is more time for plant development prior to heat and drought conditions of summer.

After seeding, cover the seed with soil to a depth of approximately 1/8 inch by lightly hand raking with a garden rake or dragging a flexible steel door mat over the area. To ensure proper seed-soil moisture contact for rapid germina­tion, firm the soil around the seed by rolling with a weighted lawn roller or by some other means of packing the seedbed. The chance of establishment from broadcast is high only if the newly emerging root is able to penetrate the soil surface easily and if the surface is kept moist.

Mulching the seedbed following seeding helps to ensure favorable temperature and moisture conditions for rapid seed germination and seedling growth. It also helps to stabilize loose soil and seed during rain and high winds. This is particularly true on slopes. Distributing clean wheat straw at approximately 100 pounds per 1000 ft2 is one of the preferred methods of mulching. Placing string over the mulch every 3 feet will help prevent it from being blown by wind.

Keep the upper 1-inch surface of the seedbed moist by daily, light watering for at least 10 to 14 days. When a majority of the seed has germinated and bermudagrass seedlings are about 3/4 inch tall or tall fescue seedlings are about 2 inches tall, remove the straw mulch. After the seed germinates and becomes established, practice deeper, less frequent watering.

Hydroseeding involves spraying seed suspended in water on the area to be established. Fertilizer and mulch are commonly added to the suspension. Hydroseeding is very effective for hard-to-plant areas, such as slopes. Since the seed is placed on the soil surface, frequent, light irrigations are critical for keeping the seed moist. Hydroseeding is normally accomplished on a contract basis.

Sodding

Sodding provides an almost instant lawn. It is important to have the seedbed moist (but not waterlogged) prior to the arrival of fresh sod. Therefore, moisten the upper 5 to 6 inches of seedbed soil several days before sodding, plugging, or sprigging.

Sod transplanting involves the manual placement of individual slabs or rolls of sod in a staggered, checker board pattern (Figure 2). It is helpful to place the first sod pieces along a straight edge, such as a driveway or sidewalk and then work toward the middle. Fit sod pieces snug against each other to prevent exposure and drying of the edges. After laying the sod, tamp or roll the area to ensure proper contact between sod and underlying soil. Water should be immediately applied. On large areas it is best to plant and water smaller sections at a time. Sod warm-season turfgrasses at least one month before the first fall frost in order to allow enough time for adequate rooting.

(Video) Turfgrass Care & Maintenance

Sprigging

Sprigging rates are shown in Table 2. Sprigging can be accomplished mechanically or manually. It normally involves planting sprigs (stems or runners with two to four nodes, or joints) in furrows that are 1 to 2 inches deep and 10 to 18 inches apart (Figure 4). Sprigs should be placed at 4- to 6-inch intervals within furrows. Shallower planting results in more rapid establishment. The ideal placement is leaving one-quarter of each sprig above ground after planting (Figure 5). Roll or tamp soil around sprigs after planting and keep the upper surface (1 to 2 inches) moist by daily, light ir­rigation until the grass is well rooted and spreading. In large areas, it is best to sprig and water smaller sections at a time. Sprig warm-season turfgrasses at least two months before the first fall frost in order to allow enough time for spread and rooting.

Broadcast sprigging involves uniformly spreading the recommended amount of sprigs over the seedbed surface. Spread a 0.25- to 0.5-inch layer of topsoil or sand over the sprigs and/or lightly press sprigs partially into the surface by a disk or roto-tiller, set 2 to 3 inches deep. Roll or tamp soil around sprigs after planting and keep the upper surface (1 to 2 inches) moist by daily, light irrigations.


Plugging

Plugging involves the transplanting of small pieces of sod into holes of the same size. The advantage of plugging over sprigging is that plugs have a greater chance of becoming established than sprigs. This is because individual sprigs have little if any roots with adhering soil and are smaller with less plant storage material to help them get started. The disadvantage of plugging is that it normally takes more time to obtain total lawn coverage than with sprigging and it is a more labor intensive project than sprigging. Plugging can be accomplished mechanically or manually. Plugs can be either circular (1 to 2 inches diameter) or square (1 to 2 inches square) or irregular in shape but approximately the same size as round or square plugs. Plugs are planted on 6- to 12-inch centers (Figure 3). That is, there are 6 to 12 inches between rows of plugs and there are 6 to 12 inches between individual plugs within each row. Always plug zoysiagrass on 6-inch centers, due to its slow establishment rate. Roll or tamp soil around each plug after planting and keep the upper surface (1 to 2 inches) moist until the grass is well rooted and spreading. In large areas, it is best to plant and water smaller sections at a time. Plug warm-season turfgrasses at least two months before the first fall frost in order to allow enough time for adequate spread and rooting.

Figure 1. When seeding a lawn, divide the recommended amount of seed into two equal portions and spread each portion in a different direction to ensure uniform distribution.

Establishing a Lawn in Oklahoma — Oklahoma State University Turfgrass Science (1)

Figure 2. Sod transplanting involves the manual placement of individual slabs or rolls of sod in a staggered, checker board pattern. It is helpful to place the first sod pieces along a straight edge, such as a driveway or sidewalk, and then work toward the middle. Snugly fit sod pieces against each other to prevent exposure and drying of the edges. Do not tuck the edges or ends of sod underneath adjacent pieces of sod.

Establishing a Lawn in Oklahoma — Oklahoma State University Turfgrass Science (2)

Figure 3. Plugs are planted on 6- to 12-inch centers. That is, there are 6 to 12inches between rows of plugs and there are 6 to 12inches between individual plugs within each row.

Establishing a Lawn in Oklahoma — Oklahoma State University Turfgrass Science (3)

Figure 4. Sprigging normally involves planting sprigs in furrows that are 1 to 2inches deep and 10 to 18 inches apart. Sprigs should be placed at 4- to 6-inch intervals within furrows.

(Video) Types of Turfgrasses for Your Lawn

Establishing a Lawn in Oklahoma — Oklahoma State University Turfgrass Science (4)

Figure 5. The ideal placement of sprigs leaves one-quarter of each sprig above ground after planting.
HLA-6419-5

Establishing a Lawn in Oklahoma — Oklahoma State University Turfgrass Science (5)

Post-Establishment Care
Watering should be done on a daily basis for several weeks after planting. Only the upper 1 to 2 inches of soil need to be moistened until the turf is rooted and spreading. As the turf becomes more established, begin deeper, less frequent irrigations to promote deeper rooting and a hardier turf. However, never allow newly established turf to experi­ence moisture stress.

A fertilizer application three to four weeks after planting with a nitrogen fertilizer will enhance establishment. Fertilize at a rate of approximately 0.5 pound N per 1000 ft2.

Begin mowing when the turf foliage reaches the intended cutting height. Mowing as soon as it is needed will promote lateral spread and rooting.

In small areas, weed control can be accomplished by hand-pulling. Herbicides should be avoided for at least the first three to four weeks following planting. Only when weed competition is hindering turfgrass coverage should herbicides be considered during establishment. The organic arsenicals (DSMA, MSMA, AMA) are reasonably safe on newly sodded, plugged, or sprigged bermudagrass for the control of emerged summer annual grassy seeds, such as crabgrass and sandbur. Ronstar and Barricade, pre-emergent herbicides (crabgrass preventers), are safe on newly sodded, plugged, or sprigged common-type bermudagrass. Ronstar cannot be used by home consumers on home/residential lawns. The herbicide 2,4-D and related compounds are not safe when applied at rates that are normally used on established bermudagrass.

For detailed information on caring for an established lawn, see Fact Sheet HLA-6420, Lawn Management in Okla­homa.

OSU Turfgrass Extension Facts (HLA, EPP), Current Reports (CR), and Leaflet (L):

Management
HLA-6418 Selecting a Lawn Grass for Oklahoma
HLA-6419 Establishing a Lawn in Oklahoma
HLA-6420 Lawn Management in Oklahoma
HLA-6600 Turfgrass Management of Bermudagrass Football Fields
CR-6602 Performance of Tall Fescues at Stillwater, OK
HLA-6604 Thatch Management in Lawns
CR-6605 Directory of Turfgrass Sod Sources in Oklahoma
L-249 Soil Testing: The Right First Step Toward Proper Care of Your Lawn and Garden
L-253 Don’t Bag It Lawn Care Plan

(Video) Turfgrass Aerification

Weed Control
HLA-6421 Controlling Weeds in Home Lawns
HLA-6423 Controlling Grassy Weeds in Home Lawns
HLA-6601 Broadleaf Weed Control for Lawns in Okla­homa

Disease Control
CR-6606 Managing Large Patch of Zoysiagrass
EPP-7658 Dollar Spot of Turfgrass
EPP-7665 Managing Spring Dead Spot Disease of Bermudagrass

Insect Control
EPP-7306 Ornamental and Lawn Pest Control

FAQs

How long does it take for a lawn to be fully established? ›

Depending on the exact conditions and the time of year we plant, it can take anywhere from three months to a year from the day a lawn is seeded until it's fully grown in. A lot goes on in that time, but it can be frustrating if you don't know what to expect when.

How do you prepare a field for a lawn? ›

It is a clay type use gypsum as well use a rotary hoe to mix this well into the ground and then rake

When should I put grass seed down in Oklahoma? ›

Warm-season grasses are best planted when upper soil temperatures are between 68°F to 95°F. Cool-season seed germinates readily in temperatures between 68°F to 86°F. For Oklahoma, this means that you should plant warm-season grasses between May 1st and July 1st.

What's the best time of year to seed a new lawn? ›

1) Most successful

The last five weeks of summer to early autumn, pending the weather, is the best time of year to seed. At this time, day and nighttime temperatures are cooling, dew is more present on lawns, and annual broadleaf weeds and crabgrass are dying.

Which method is very fast for establishment of lawn in garden? ›

The quickest method of developing a lawn is by turfing, but the cost is prohibitive. Turf is a piece of earth of about 5 cm thickness with grass thickly grown over it. The pieces may be of small squares or in rolls small width (30 cm or so). The turf must be free from weed and consist of the required lawn grass.

Will grass seed grow if I just throw it down? ›

Let us start with the simple question, will the seed grow if it is just thrown on the ground? The simple answer is, yes. Beyond just throwing the seed out into the lawn and not performing any grass maintenance there is a whole world of lawn care. While the seed is one of the most resilient out there.

Which is the fastest growing grass? ›

One of the fastest growing plants in the world – some can grow up to three feet in 24 hours – the bamboo (Bambuseae) belongs to the Poaceae plant family of grass plants. Because it can shoot up to 100 feet, it is often mistaken as a tree. Interestingly, its roots are in Kannada, from where the term bambu comes.

What temp does fescue go dormant? ›

Dormancy can occur in Tall Fescue affecting growth when temperatures drop below 50°. In other words, Tall Fescue will stop growing when dormancy occurs. Also be aware frost, snow and the recent sub-freezing temperatures can damage your Tall Fescue grass.

Should I put topsoil down before grass seed? ›

Should I Put Topsoil Down Before Grass Seed? If you're applying pure seed to the ground, a layer of topsoil should always be put down first rather than after. Some plant seeds like to be covered to germinate, but grass seeds need to be at surface level to sprout and grow.

How do you level a field for grass? ›

How to Level a Yard [8 Steps]
  1. STEP 1: Mow Your Lawn. ...
  2. STEP 2: Dethatch Your Lawn [As Needed] ...
  3. STEP 3: Dig up the grass in the sunken area of the lawn. ...
  4. STEP 4: Make Soil Mix: Topsoil, Sand and Compost. ...
  5. STEP 5: Fill Sunken Areas and Holes with Soil Mixture. ...
  6. STEP 6: Even Out the Entire Lawn. ...
  7. STEP 7: Water the Lawn.
17 Jan 2022

Should you compact topsoil before laying turf? ›

Remove any surface stone, clods, other debris and perennial weeds. Once loosened the soil should be lightly compacted by walking over the whole area and then again at right angles to the first direction. Break up any heavily compacted areas using a fork and fill any dips, lightly compacting.

What kind of grass grows best in Oklahoma? ›

Bermudagrass is the warm-season turfgrass species most commonly planted in Oklahoma. It is the best-adapted turf¬grass for full-sun areas due to its excellent heat and drought tolerance during the summer and its sufficient winter hardiness.

What's the best grass to grow in Oklahoma? ›

4 Best Grass Types in Oklahoma City
  1. Bermudagrass. Bermudagrass is a warm-season grass with a grayish-green color. ...
  2. Perennial ryegrass. Perennial ryegrass is a cool-season grass that will go dormant in the summer heat. ...
  3. Buffalograss. ...
  4. Zoysiagrass.
19 Jul 2021

What is the best grass seed to plant in Oklahoma? ›

Buffalograss is best suited to full-sun sites in areas of Oklahoma receiving 12 to 25 inches of rainfall per year. It grows best on heavy-textured soils and has some tolerance of alkaline soils. Buffalograss is the best choice for unirrigated lawns and general turf areas of western Oklahoma.

Is March too early to plant grass seed? ›

Is March too early to plant grass seed? March is too early to plant most grass seeds. Unless you live in a warm region, temperatures will be too low at this time of year. Be sure to wait until daily temperatures average around 80 degrees Fahrenheit to plant grass.

Is April too early to plant grass seed? ›

If you have your heart set on planting grass in spring, early April is, in fact, the best time to do it.

What comes first fertilizer or grass seed? ›

You can plant grass seed immediately after applying fertilizer. Please make sure there is no weed preventer in the fertilizer, as this will also prevent the grass seed from germinating.

Which is the most common method for establishing the lawn? ›

Sod Establishment

Laying sod is the quickest and easiest method of establishing a lawn.

Which is the cheapest method of lawn planting? ›

Dibbling roots

This is the cheapest but time consuming method. Small pieces of grass roots should be dibbled 10 – 15 cm apart in a leveled ground when it is wet after rain. The roots spread and grow underground in the course of six months making a fairly compact lawn by frequent mowing, rolling and watering.

How thick should lawn topsoil be? ›

Usually, 8 inches of topsoil is needed to fill a new garden bed or raised bed. If you intend to add topsoil to your lawn, you will need approximately 4-6 inches of topsoil to give you the healthy lawn you desire.

What happens if you use too much grass seed? ›

Too much grass seed causes undue competition for resources such as light, water and nutrients, and grass seedlings struggle as a result. Too little seed leaves lawns thin or bare.

Will grass seed grow on top of dirt? ›

Grass seed spread on top of the soil will still attempt to grow, but you will get poor results compared to grass seed that has been covered with 1/4 inch of soil. Uncovered seed is prone to drying out, being eaten by birds, or carried away by water runoff.

Will grass eventually fill in bare spots? ›

Some grass grows laterally and will naturally fill in bare spots on the lawn. These are either Rhizome grasses or Stolon grasses. Rhizome grasses grow with spreading root systems underneath the soil.

What is the hardiest grass seed? ›

Tall fescue

It is one of the most drought-resistant turfgrass varieties. As a cool-season grass type, tall fescue would fare best in northern climates. In the summer, tall fescue can benefit from overseeding with warm-season grass seeds. It has a wide blade and ranges in color from medium to dark green.

What grass spreads the best? ›

Both bluegrass and bentgrass are cool season spreading type grasses, according to Grounds Maintenance Magazine. Because these grasses do not tolerate hot temperatures, it is best to plant them in the northern regions of the United States.

What is the toughest grass? ›

Red Fescue

The "toughest" grasses (considering only that characteristic) are the sports-turf grasses like common Bermuda, hybrid Bermuda or zoysia. These grasses have a trailing growth habit and handle heavy foot traffic better than cool-season grasses (like fescues).

Should you water dormant fescue? ›

Dry slopes

Grasses may go dormant or be killed by heat and drought. These sites are also difficult to irrigate. Long, slow watering is needed to facilitate water uptake and prevent runoff. Very frequent watering is needed in the heat of summer.

How do you keep fescue green in winter? ›

Fertilize. You should fertilize your tall fescue lawn in fall when temperatures have cooled to somewhere in the 50s, but your grass is still growing. Fertilizing at this time will help grass plants stay green into the winter, but more importantly, it will promote healthy root growth.

What grass does not go dormant in winter? ›

But there are some grass types that are able to withstand heat and cold extremes, including in the transitional zones, and produce that coveted green color during winter: bermudagrass, zoysia and Kentucky bluegrass.

Which of the following is used in lawn preparation? ›

Solution : 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2, 4-D) is used to prepare weed-free lawns by the gardeners.

What should be the characters of a good lawn grass? ›

A healthy lawn is not only lush and green, but it has defined edges. Healthy lawns can be achieved by monitoring a few simple things. Primarily you'll need to inspect lawns for pests and disease, maintain a rigorous watering and mowing schedule, and take adequate measures to care for your lawn during the off-season.

What do I add to my soil before planting grass? ›

Add seeding soil to the top of your existing soil and smooth with the rake. If you are not using seeding soil, add the starter grass fertilizer on top of the existing soil with a spreader. Mix well-rotted manure or compost into the soil, refilling any holes. Smooth the area with a rake and lightly pat it down.

Which grass is used for lawn? ›

The common grass species used for lawn making.
S.NoBotanical NameCommon name
1Cynodon dactylonHariyali (or) Doob grass
2Stenotaphrum secundatumSt. Augustine grass
3Sporobolus tremulusChain grass
4Poa pratensisBlue grass
8 more rows
30 Apr 2012

What should I add to my lawn for soil? ›

Before seeding or sodding, it's important to thoroughly work the soil. Amend poor soils, such as heavy clay, by adding organic matter. Sources include compost, rotted manure, peat, and quality topsoil. Sand is not suggested as a material to improve clay soils for home lawns.

What grass spreads the best? ›

Both bluegrass and bentgrass are cool season spreading type grasses, according to Grounds Maintenance Magazine. Because these grasses do not tolerate hot temperatures, it is best to plant them in the northern regions of the United States.

What is the toughest grass? ›

Red Fescue

The "toughest" grasses (considering only that characteristic) are the sports-turf grasses like common Bermuda, hybrid Bermuda or zoysia. These grasses have a trailing growth habit and handle heavy foot traffic better than cool-season grasses (like fescues).

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